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Sexting: an exploration of practices, attitudes and influences

Research supported by the NSPCC

December 2012

The UK Safer Internet Centre, in consultation with the NSPCC, conducted research with small groups of year 9 and year 6 pupils into their experiences of sexting.

This report builds on the findings of A qualitative study of children, young people and 'sexting' which was published in May 2012.

Sexting: an exploration of practices, attitudes and influences (PDF, 172KB)


Methodology

The researchers conducted 12 focus groups with 120 young people, aged 13 to 14 years, across three counties in England. An additional 30 children aged 10-11, from two different counties in England, were also questioned.

Key messages

The research found that:

  • there was widespread knowledge of sexting amongst 13-14 year olds. Although not everyone was engaged in sexting, many had peers that were
  • 13-14 year old girls tended to self-generate as a result of a request from a boy, whilst boys tended to self-generate unprompted
  • many 13-14 year olds reported that the fear of being judged would prevent them from talking to an adult if something went wrong
  • most 10-11 year olds had to deal with some form of online abuse, but there was little evidence that they were exposed to sexualised content, or asked to self-generate.

Read the report: Sexting: an exploration of practices, attitudes and influences (PDF, 172KB)

Please cite as: Phippen, Andy (2012) Sexting: an exploration of practices, attitudes and influences. London: NSPCC and UK Safer Internet Centre.


Contact the NSPCC Information Service for specialist information on child sexual abuse or any child protection topic