Impact - evidence blocks - hidden

Childline

To be displayed on the Childline service page - which will be redesigned and updated as part of this project. It will also feature on: 1. Samantha's story 2. Omar's story 3. James' story 4. Sioned's story 5. Sally's story 6. Depression, anxiety and mental health 7. Self-harm 8. Volunteer for Childline

How Childline helps


During the coronavirus pandemic, restrictions put a lot of pressure on children. Now they need us more than ever. Childline is a free service for children and young people open 365 days a year. We've delivered an average of around 17,000 counselling sessions a month since the first national lockdown began.

Childline is here for children, even if no one else is listening. Whatever problems or dangers children are facing we’re here to listen – day or night.

"Isolation has been a torture for most. Children and young people are able to call Childline and to actually be honest. They know that someone's going to hear them."
Omar, Childline counsellor

Children don’t always know who to trust with their worries. Without a safe place to turn – they can put their trust in the wrong person or keep their fears to themselves. Home isn’t a safe place for every child, and the pandemic made even more children feel trapped, lonely, and unsure who to trust.

"A lot of young people are struggling at the moment with the isolation. They are having to stay at home, which isn’t always the safest of places for them. They are missing school which to a lot of them is a sanctuary and gives them that respite from home life."
David Taylor Childline Supervisor (Prestatyn)

Childline gives every child access to free, confidential support whenever they need it. In 2019/20, 34,513 children and young people talked about a problem for the first time with a Childline counsellor. Childline is here when no one else is listening.

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Childline is here for children and young people wherever and whenever they need. It's operated by 1,200 volunteers around the UK - who delivered over 230,000 counselling sessions in 2019/20 alone.

"The volunteers who contribute are exceptional people… [We] are committed to the service continuing because we want to guarantee it is there for children and young people. We realise there is a real need and we are there for them."
Gwenno Huws, Childline volunteer counsellor (Prestatyn)

The pandemic meant big changes for us all – including Childline. We adapted how we deliver our service so our volunteers can continue to support young people safely - practicing social distancing in our service centres. We also created new volunteer roles - answering emails from children and young people - to allow volunteers to work virtually from the safety of their homes. 

The Childline website puts young people first – with games, tools, advice and support about anything from making friends to child abuse. Last year, we created www.childline.org.uk/kids specifically for children under-12, to ensure our information is accessible for young people of all ages. We also released new self-help tools to help children cope with feeling low, bored or anxious – including the Calm Zone and the Coping Kit. Young people also turn to Childline’s message boards to share their worries with other young people in a safe online space, with 48, 583 posts submitted in total in 2018/19.

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We want to be there for every child who needs us, no matter what their worry or how they choose to contact us. Sadly, we couldn’t respond to 1 in 3 children and young people who needed us.

With more and more calls for help, children and young people sometimes have to wait for a Childline counsellor to be available. We’re always looking to improve our counselling services and make sure we’re there with them while they wait.

We’re working with our technology partner O2 to create a chat bot to ask important opening questions to children and young people while they wait. It will also point them to helpful advice, support and games around the site to try in the meantime.  

On average, online counselling sessions take twice as long as over the phone – and make up around three quarters of our sessions. By using a chat bot we can increase the number of sessions we deliver and help counsellors by providing them with more information before each session.

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It costs £4 to answer a child’s call for help.
Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.
Give children a voice when no one else is listening.

Donate now

Volunteer with us

Hear from some of the children Childline has helped

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"I have been seeing a counsellor at school for the last few years which has helped. I only see them once a week so in between I look at the Childline website for tips on managing anger and stress."
Boy, 13, Childline website user

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"I just wanted to thank Childline for the chat yesterday. Your support saved my friendship. Everything is better now, and I am so relieved. I will definitely come back to Childline if I ever need support again."
Girl, 11, counselled by Leeds Childline base

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"Having someone reply to me on the message boards to say I helped shows the difference I can make, even if it’s really small. I can be the reason why someone keeps going and it also shows it’s not just me, we’re not alone in what we’re going through and that’s just relief"
Childline message board user

"I just wanted to thank Childline for the chat yesterday. Your support saved my friendship. Everything is better now, and I am so relieved. I will definitely come back to Childline if I ever need support again."
Girl, 11, counselled by Leeds Childline base

"I’m so grateful to Childline for listening to me. The advice you give always helps me to think clearer so I can make better decisions in my life. I feel so much better now."
Young person who called Childline, aged 14

"Having someone reply to me on the message boards to say I helped shows the difference I can make, even if it’s really small. I can be the reason why someone keeps going and it also shows it’s not just me, we’re not alone in what we’re going through and that’s just relief"
Childline message board user

"I just wanted to thank Childline for the chat yesterday. Your support saved my friendship. Everything is better now, and I am so relieved. I will definitely come back to Childline if I ever need support again."
Girl, 11, counselled by Leeds Childline base

"I really love that you have this community created for all ages. I’ve been trying to find places like this, so thank you for having this where we can talk and support each other. I doubt there is another just as supportive and safe message boards anywhere."
Childline message board user

"I have been seeing a counsellor at school for the last few years which has helped. I only see them once a week so in between I look at the Childline website for tips on managing anger and stress."
Boy, 13, Childline website user

Together for Childhood

Block to be displayed on Together for Childhood page.

How Together for Childhood helps

We work hard to provide services that help children who’ve experienced abuse go on to live safe and happy lives.  But to make a lasting difference we also need to prevent child abuse from happening in the first place. 

Together for Childhood allows us to work with local communities to support families to keep children safe, and to stop child abuse before it starts. We are continuously learning what works where and why so we can help to protect more children and young people. In 2019 alone, we helped over 1,600 children through activities and therapeutic services in their local community.

Around 1 in 5 children in the UK have suffered abuse – that’s 2 in every primary school class. We estimate that more than half a million children suffer abuse or neglect in the UK each year.

We must have an unrelenting focus on identifying what works in preventing abuse and neglect from happening.  We know certain things make abuse more likely – and if we can provide support when it’s needed we can help prevent abuse happening. Together for Childhood allows us to work with communities and families to do this.

"the practitioner came out to see me once a week and we would talk about how I was feeling and we worked on healthy ways to manage my feelings. She helped me build up my self-esteem and realise that I wasn’t a bad or evil person, and the past was in the past and I couldn’t change that but, I could change the future."
Parent in Glasgow

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Child abuse is preventable.  Together for Childhood allows us to work with local communities to combine the best of what social care, schools, health, voluntary and community groups, the police, and the NSPCC are already doing to prevent child abuse and neglect before it starts. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic – our local teams worked hard to support communities and families with the devastating impact of COVID.

"I cannot thank [staff member] enough for everything she has done for me and my family. Even with COVID-19 going on, [staff member] was still able to provide amazing support over the phone and I really wouldn’t have been able to get through any of it without her"
Parent in Glasgow

We’re working in:

  • Govan in Glasgow
    In Glasgow our team built a community Toy Library to give parents and families access to free toys and games to play with at home.
  • East and West Marsh Wards in Grimsby
    In Grimsby our team has been educating families about the power of play and how it helps new born babies’ brains develop with our Look, Say, Sing, Play materials – promoting this in clinics and community venues (such as supermarkets).
  • Ernesettle in Plymouth
    Our team worked with a local secondary school to develop a campaign, funded by The Samworth Foundation, to help young people understand what healthy relationships look like.
  • Chell Heath and Fegg Hayes in Stoke on Trent
    Our local team, in partnership with JCB, distributed 3,850 home cooked meals to families in need of support.

These are just a few examples of the work we’ve done over the last year. The Together for Childhood programme strives to create opportunities for local families, and specialist services to help those facing severe challenges support their children and help them thrive.

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Coronavirus has meant families need us now more than ever. But with lockdowns and social distancing – our teams have had to face new challenges. While we haven’t been able to provide the same level of face-to-face support and engagement – our local teams have collaborated with local business to help raise funds so we can continue to support the children and young people who need us most:

  • funding a bid for £8,000 to help with digital poverty
  • working with partners to educate families and young people about online safety – as they face an increased risk of online abuse throughout the pandemic
  • creating community safeguarding videos to increase understanding of abuse, neglect and what to do if something happens
  • agreeing funding for a 2-year plan to support HSB interventions across Stoke and Staffordshire.

We will continue to listen and work with local communities to understand their needs, and combine resources with partners and local agencies to support local families that need our support. Each place we work is different – so we tailor our approach to their specific needs so we can provide the best possible support to children and young people in their communities.

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£5 could pay for art materials to help a child express their feelings when they are unable to find the words.
Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

Donate now

Volunteer with us

Hear from the people we're working with

"I feel that we have all learned new things and are more aware of risks online. I also believe that my daughter has gained in confidence."
Parent in Stoke who did our InCtrl course

"As a practitioner, it has been thrilling for me the last 2 weeks to be able to see and feel that I am helping families make changes even through just a listening ear or a bit of advice and guidance. In our normal work, change can be such a slow process so it has been really heartening to see that I can make a difference in a relatively short period of time through ‘listening’ and a few ideas being implemented"
Practitioner working with us in Glasgow

"I cannot thank [staff member] enough for everything she has done for me and my family. Even with COVID-19 going on, [staff member] was still able to provide amazing support over the phone and I really wouldn’t have been able to get through any of it without her"
Parent in Glasgow who did our Circle of Security course

How the Lighthouse helps

Getting the right support when a child has been abused is so important. But after sexual abuse, children and their families often struggle to navigate health and social care, therapeutic services, police and often the criminal justice process by themselves.

That’s why we’re proud to have helped launch the Lighthouse, London’s first Child House, in October 2018.  It's the first centre in the UK to bring multiple agencies together under one roof to provide a child-friendly, multidisciplinary service for victims and survivors of child sexual abuse and exploitation. Based in Camden, it serves the London boroughs of Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Haringey and Islington.

The Lighthouse is a truly collaborative effort, with services provided by University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trusts, NSPCC, The Brandon Centre, Camden Council, The Metropolitan Police Service, Respond, and Solace Women’s Aid.  

"The Lighthouse has been a little bit of refuge."
Parent in London

When a child has experienced sexual abuse, they and their family are often left to navigate finding the right support for their child alone. From health care professionals, social workers, therapists and the police – this frequently means the child has to re-tell and re-live their experience with each agency or professional, risking being re-traumatised by the process 

The Lighthouse is based on the international Child House (Barnahus) model, established in Reykjavik in 1998. This model is child-centred, allowing medical and sexual health professionals, counsellors, therapists, and the police to work together under one roof – guiding children, young people and their families through their journey of recovery, helping them access the support they need at every step, including the court process. 

"I only have to tell the story once."
Child using The Lighthouse in London

In London, where The Lighthouse is based, only 1 in 4 children and young people who report sexual abuse to the police receive any emotional and health support. Those who do sometimes have to wait months to receive therapy and the support they need. Up to 8 in 10 adolescents who experience sexual abuse develop mental health problems within 5 months. That is why it is so important children get the help they need when they need it.

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In 2019/20, The Lighthouse received 321 referrals - meaning approximately 1 in 2 children in North Central London who reported sexual offences were referred there for support. The Lighthouse team were able to accept 258 of those referrals, supporting children and families through this difficult time.

The team regularly ask children and their parents what they like about the service centre. Children felt that at The Lighthouse: 

  • their views were taken seriously 
  • they were listened to 
  • the practitioners were easy to talk to
  • and that the Lighthouse teams were working together to support them. 

"I like the way I can talk and be advised and listened to. I can also talk about what I’d like to talk about."
Child using The Lighthouse in London

The majority of parents and guardians that fedback to us felt the services they received were good, and felt supported by The Lighthouse. 

"I don’t know how my family would have got through this trauma without this service. Truly amazing."
Parent in London

The Mayor of London’s Office for Policing and Crime is evaluating the Lighthouse and has published three reports to date, with a final report due in Summer 2021.  

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We believe every child should have the support they need after facing sexual abuse. Being a partner in The Lighthouse has shown us the difference a Child House can make for young people who've experienced abuse and we're pleased that funding for The Lighthouse in London has been extended to March 2022.

"Think it’s a great service dedicated to young people and their families. Should have more around the UK"
Parent in London

Given the success of the Lighthouse in London, we’ll advocate nationally for the benefits of this model and campaign to have new sites funded and built across the UK. 

With support from government and commissioners – we can make the Child Houses model an integral part of the support and services available to children who’ve experienced abuse.

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Thanks to the Home Office, The Mayor of London’s Office for Policing and Crime, NHS England, the Department for Education, charity partner Morgan Stanley (who raised over £1.5m) this multi-agency project was brought to life. The generous funding the project received helped to refurbish and transform the NSPCC’s service centre in North London. 

£25 could pay for toys for children to use during therapeutic sessions to help explain how they’re feeling.
Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

Donate now

Hear from some of the people we've helped

"I like the way I can talk and be advised and listened to. I can also talk about what I’d like to talk about."
Child using The Lighthouse in London

"Relaxed and calming place with understanding people very keen to help and reassure."
Parent in London

"Even though my situation may have made my mother sad, now I can tell her anything and you brought us closer together."
Child using The Lighthouse in London

"I don’t know how my family would have got through this trauma without this service. Truly amazing."
Parent in London

"I only have to tell the story once."
Child using The Lighthouse in London

"Definitely, supportive and helpful."
Parent in London

"The lighthouse has been a little bit of refuge."
Parent in London

"Amazing support, compassion, efficiency, level of training, great explaining, thoughtful."
Parent in London

"A welcoming friendly environment with a family feel rather than a stuffy office."
Parent in London

"In the Lighthouse they made me feel comfortable and made me feel open about my opinions."
Parent in London

"The service is very professional without feeling detached from me. The professionals are very competent and warm as there are sensitive discussions taking place and this is a must during these times."
Parent in London

School services

Block to be displayed on the Working with schools page - as well as the Volunteering with schools page.

How our Speak out Stay safe service helps

Child abuse is preventable – not inevitable. That is why we're here, fighting for every childhood.  Part of the work we do to keep children safe is to explain in an interactive, age-appropriate way what abuse is, how to spot the signs, and what to do if they are ever made to feel scared or worried by something.

Volunteers visit primary schools to deliver Speak out Stay safe assemblies and workshops that help children understand they have a right to feel safe, that abuse is never their fault and that they can speak to a trusted adult or Childline if they ever need help or support.

Thanks to the hard work of over 900 volunteers and staff members – this programme was a finalist in the 'Safeguarding Award' category for the Children and Young People Now Awards 2020.

"My daughter came home empowered and enlightened because of your assembly and your powerful message. She was singing the helpline number all evening and talking about Buddy. Thank you for taking your important message to the children. It is truly amazing and effective work that you do."
Torin, parent

We estimate that more than half a million children suffer abuse or neglect in the UK each year. In the average primary school class, this means that at least 2 children have suffered abuse or neglect.

Abuse can derail a child’s development.  But it’s never too late to help a child. Child abuse and its effects are preventable. We can work together to stop abuse happening and support children who have been abused. 

That’s why we've visited primary schools across the UK and Channel Islands to give children the knowledge and confidence to speak out if they’re worried by something. Our specially trained staff and volunteers deliver interactive assemblies and workshops to help kids remember important safety messages, learning about abuse and where they can get support in an accessible and age-appropriate way.

In March 2020, we reached 90 per cent of primary schools, reaching more than 5 million children.

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During the pandemic, our staff and volunteers weren’t able to visit schools to deliver our assemblies or workshops. But now more than ever, children need to know what to do and who to speak to if something worries or upsets them.

So, we worked with Ant, Dec and David Walliams to film our Speak out Stay safe assembly – so children and families could join in from home. This was seen by hundreds of thousands of children and won “Influencer / Celebrity Campaign of the Year” from the UK Content Awards 2020. To help children remember what they learnt, we came up with fun activities for parents to try with their kids at home.

We also created an online assembly for schools to use, with a hub of helpful resources – from videos to information packs - for teachers to use to continue conversations with their classes about safeguarding. 

It’s important that every child understands they have the right to stay safe. We developed versions of our resources in Welsh, in British Sign Language (BSL) for d/Deaf children and for children with special educational needs and disability (SEND). 

By March 2020, before the pandemic, we had reached 90 per cent of primary schools across the UK and Channel Islands, reaching more than 5 million children.

An initial evaluation of Speak out Stay safe in 2018 found that after attending the SOSS assembly and workshop, more pupils: 

  • were able to recognise some types of abuse that can happen to children 
  • knew the correct Childline phone number 
  • said they were willing to contact Childline to report abuse or bullying. 

Some children spoke about abuse or neglect for the first time during or following one of our sessions and we and their school staff were there to give them a supportive response. 

"The NSPCC came into my school today. It was really good to hear about Childline and to know that I can talk to you about anything. I have been getting bullied at school so I have been feeling quite sad. Knowing that Childline is always here for children really helps."
Boy, age 11

We are continuing to evaluate Speak out. Stay safe to understand the impact it has for children and to improve how the programme is deliveredThe findings from our evaluation will be available later in 2021. 

Our new online resources empower schools to deliver the assemblies themselves and help students recall key safety messages about abuse and neglect through engaging classroom activities. Linking directly to their curriculum, this online course is an effective way of supporting schools’ safeguarding duties and help us keep children safely. 

Now we’re looking into developing a service for secondary schools so we can reach older children and young people, and help them understand they have a right to feel safe.  We are currently developing content for this new programme and we plan to launch a pilot in the autumn term of 2021.

"It's important that you know about it, even if you don’t need it in your lifetime, if you pass it on to your children and they just keep passing it on. At least then they'll be aware […] and they know there is someone to turn to."
Child, year 6

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 £8 could pay for posters for 200 classrooms to help them remember Buddy and the messages they've learned in our assemblies.
Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

Donate now

Hear from parents, children and school staff about our assemblies

"it’s a good way of learning, like, if you’ve been bullied before – you can say ‘stop you’re bullying me’. So you know what they’re doing to you ‘cause you might not know."
Child in year 3

"The children really respond to Buddy and the messaging about abuse is simple, age appropriate and very effective. From my time at other schools I know that children have gone on to contact Childline, who have been able to help them enormously. This is such an important and crucially free resource for schools."
Lorna Rainey, headteacher at Belford primary school

"[The children] have a better toolkit to deal with situations that they are possibly unhappy with than they did at the start, without a shadow of doubt."
Year 6 teacher

"You visited our school last term and it was really fun. I liked Buddy and still remember the number you taught us. It's nice knowing that Childline is always here for me if I ever need them."
Girl, age 11

DART

Block to be displayed on the Children's Services page - as well as on Domestic Abuse and Our successful campaigns. With DART and the reforms to Domestic Abuse Bill bein separated into individual blocks.

How DART helps

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Around 1 in 5 children have been exposed to domestic abuse. Children never just ‘witness’ domestic abuse. Exposure to domestic abuse is child abuse, and it can have a significant impact on a child’s development, health and wellbeing.

We developed a group work programme, Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together (DART), to help children cope with the effects of domestic abuse.  Our programme allows children and mothers to talk openly, learn to communicate about what’s happened and rebuild their relationship.  The service, recognised by the Home Office, also provides an opportunity to meet with and learn from others who’ve lived through similar experiences.

"I have seen my parents physically hurting each other for years. I used to cry every day and self-harm. I feel like I’m really affected by what I’ve seen. I have a boyfriend now and I feel like he’s acting just like my dad. I feel like I can never be in a stable relationship."
Young Person aged 18

Domestic abuse can have a negative impact on a child's behaviour, brain development and wellbeing. Children need safety and security – and when those needs aren’t met it can take a toll on their education and their mental health.

"I really need your help; my dad has been physical abusing my mum. He has an anger problem and it's getting out of hand. The smallest things make him angry and he starts shouting. I'm terrified of him and I've had enough, I can't take it any more - please help me!"
Boy, aged 14, Childline

Home isn’t a safe place for every child, so the Covid-19 pandemic and ‘stay at home’ guidance put more children than ever at risk. With schools and face-to-face services closed – restrictions made it harder to spot if something’s wrong and harder for children to speak out about what’s happening.

During the pandemic, Childline counselling sessions and NSPCC Helpline contacts about domestic abuse increased. Our helpline responded to 5,360 contacts about domestic abuse between April and September 2020, which was 47% more than the average number of contacts before lockdown.

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We’ve been running our Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together service (DART) for 10 years. In that time, we’ve worked with more than 2,000 women and children across the UK. Since 2018, we’ve trained over 300 professionals in partner organisations to deliver DART themselves.

We evaluated DART and we found that after completing the programme:

  • mothers’ self-esteem and confidence in parenting increased
  • mothers reported more affection towards their children
  • children had fewer emotional and behavioural difficulties
  • the sessions helped children share their experiences of the abuse, and their mothers to understand them.

"I feel I and my daughter have learnt a lot coming here and we’ve become closer and understand each other more."
A mother attending the DART service

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Even as pandemic restrictions lift and schools reopened – domestic abuse is still a danger outside of lockdown. With parents still facing economic and mental health pressures, and limited access to support, the need for specialist services like DART is stronger than ever.

"[My son] never spoke to me about how he felt [whilst the abuse was happening]. Only afterwards [during a DART activity] he made a house, showing me crying in the bedroom, and [the perpetrator] on top of me and [my son] crying, it hit home to me. I thought he’d forgotten about it…But these things were still in his mind. I never thought he thought about it."
Mother who attended DART

We want more families to be able to access support so we’re looking to train and license more partners to help deliver the programme around the UK.

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£5 could pay for one of our practitioners to answer a call to our helpline.
Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

Donate now

Children are now recognised victims of domestic abuse 

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Being exposed to domestic abuse has serious consequences for children and young people; and it can affect how they feel, think and behave in harmful ways.

Thanks to our campaign and the support we received from around the UK – government agreed in September 2020 to recognise children as victims in the Domestic Abuse Bill. This means that they can access the protection and support they need to recover - and that there’s a statutory duty for services to offer the help they need. 

"I am delighted that the Domestic Abuse Bill has been passed by the House of Commons [It] will have a profound and positive impact on millions of victims, survivors and children across the country."
Victoria Adkins, Minister for Safeguarding

Support our live campaigns in 2 minutes or less

Hear from some of the families we’ve helped with DART

"I liked doing all the activities (in DART). It was fun doing them, but they [also] had a story behind them...The volcanoes [activity] meant that the more and more anger you keep inside you, it just maybe bursts out on a person who hasn’t done anything."
Child who attended DART

"All of [the DART practitioners] were so nice, they didn’t push you to talk about anything, it was up to you, and if you’d had enough you could walk away. Just by looking at them I could tell they weren’t judging me and I could trust them, one hundred per cent… They helped me to see it wasn’t my fault and they helped me to pick myself up a bit. I smiled for the first time in years, because I wasn’t hiding something. I talked about things I had never talked about and I really saw a difference in [my daughter]."
Mother who attended DART

Net Aware

Block to be displayed on NSPCC and O2 (linked to from the impact report landing page), and will also feature on: Online abuseOnline safetyOnline games,  Video apps and live streaming, Internet connected devices, Talking to your child about online safety.

How Net Aware helps

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Net Aware, created in partnership with O2, is our guide to the latest and most popular apps, sites and games used by young people, so parents and carers can stay up to date with the latest reviews and news about their child’s online world.

Net Aware provides insight into the online experiences of children and young people and shares top tips to keep children safe online.

Visit Net Aware online

The internet is an amazing place where children can play, create, learn and connect… The possibilities are endless - but these benefits don’t come without risks. It’s important that parents and other adults know the risks to children online – and feel comfortable having conversations with their kids about how they use the internet.

"We had a conversation about TikTok, because school banned TikTok. I then had a look on Net Aware [...because] I didn't know what it was, or anything about it."
Mother of daughter aged 8 years

By learning about online safety together – adults can help children and young people make safe decisions online, and that if something upsets or worries them, that they know they can turn to them for support.

That’s why we worked with O2 to create a website – Net Aware - with information and advice to help keep children safe online. Our Net Aware site includes:

  • App reviews
    Over 70 reviews of popular apps, we've recently added Netflix, Honk and Omegle.
  • News and advice pages
    Keeping parents up to date with the latest news and advice around the apps, sites and games your kids are using.
  • Expert risk ratings and age recommendations
    All reviewed apps, sites and games have a safety and support rating to help parents make informed decisions.
  • O2 Guru Top Tips
    O2 Gurus have created a number one safety tip for every app and game – this could include information on blocking, private account settings or in-app purchases.

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During the COVID lockdowns, children spent more time online than ever before. At the same time, they faced increased risks of online abuse like cyberbullying and grooming.  

During March to May 2020, the first three months of the first lockdown, 1,220 offences of sexual communication with a child were recorded by the police in England and Wales. 

"I am 12 and I don’t have social media but I wanted to get online and chat to people since my friends had done it and told me it would be fun. It started off fine with the occasional ‘hi’ and then men started sending d*** pics and saying really personal things."
Girl who contacted Childline during the pandemic

In 2020, we surveyed over 2,000 parents of 8-13 year olds to understand the impact of the O2 and NSPCC partnership. We heard:

  • 89% of users rated the Net Aware site as good or very good
  • two thirds (65%) of parents visited the Net Aware website because it had been recommended to them
  • when asked what could be done to improve Net Aware, 83% of respondents said they wouldn't make any changes.

"Net Aware is really good...with lots of new things coming out I’ll keep checking it… the good thing is, it very clearly says what the age range is."
Father of three sons aged 6, 8 and 10 years

We also recently partnered with Ambitious about Autism - speaking with parents of children with special educational needs and disabilities to learn how they keep their children safe online. We then created an online safety hub with specialised information, advice and tips for parents and carers around the UK.

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Net Aware will continue to review apps, sites and games to help parents and carers keep children safe online, including expanding to include video streaming platforms such as Netflix.  

New advice articles are published each month on relevant topics to keep parents up to date.  Parents and carers can sign up to the newsletter to get all the latest online safety news, tips and advice each month.

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Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

Donate now

 Sharing the brain story

Impact report landing page will link to NSPCC Learning - and this block will feature on:1. How our services make a difference

We’re helping children get the best start in life

Early experiences affect how our brains grow. Experiencing something negative, like abuse, can damage a growing brain and affect a child’s health later on. Positive experiences can help grow healthy structures that lay strong foundations for a healthy and happy life.

Brain development is complex but it’s important that everyone can understand the science behind it. That’s why we created our Sharing the Brain Story programme – creating a series of animation videos with simple metaphors (developed and tested by Frameworks) to explain how children’s brains grow. Through our workshops, delivered virtually last year due to COVID restrictions, we’re sharing the science behind child brain development with professionals, parents and communities around the UK.

We’re delivering this programme in Grimsby and Glasgow with support from our Together for Childhood teams. We’re also training trainers around the country – so they can train others to deliver this programme. Professionals, young people and parents who attended our first workshops said that:

  • watching our animation videos increased their knowledge of child brain development
  • the metaphors we use are relevant to their lives and helped start discussions about their personal experiences.

"I never realised back then until I’ve seen that [the video] about how the brain [of] the foetus can be affected. So [if] a female [is] pregnant, and her partner [is] being abusive and shouting, the foetus is getting affected. You know, when the baby’s in the womb. That was really interesting for me because there’s not a lot of awareness about that."
Parent who completed our Sharing the Brain Story programme

We’re working with local partners - children’s centres, police, health visitors, midwives, voluntary and community organisations, social workers and family support workers - to co-develop workshops for people who work or volunteer with children. We’re also developing materials and activities for professionals to help them share key concepts with their communities and the children they work with. 

"The facilitators were excellent. It was clear they had a breadth of experience and knowledge about the topic, especially the shared language around the metaphors. They managed the group well and delivered and informative and very interesting workshop."
Professional who took part in a Sharing the Brain Story workshop


Together – we can make sure every child grows up in an environment that gives them the best start in life.

Get trained to Share the Brain Story with us!

Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.

GCP2

Landing page will direct visitors to NSPCC Learning - and the impact block will also be featured on1. How our services make a difference 2. Neglect

We're helping protect against neglect

Neglect is the most common form of child abuse in the UK. But it takes many different forms which makes it difficult to spot, even for trained professionals like police officers, social workers and health workers.

That’s why we’ve developed a tool called Graded Care Profile 2 (GCP2) to help professionals to grade the care a child receives, and to spot where parents might need extra support.

"I’ve let my kids down [in the past].  I know that for a fact. [GCP2] it’s helping me become a better person, parent even... I thought I were going to be stuck in a rut. I were actually ready for giving them up.  [This] has helped me come back to reality instead of being back where I was."
Mother assessed with GCP2, Site A

GCP2 helps professionals build constructive relationships with the families they work with - and helps parents to understand what their child needs. With GCP2: 

  • parents see where they are a strong – and where they need support 
  • teach parents and carers  about health and hygiene, to protect against neglect 
  • show parents and carers how they can support their kids with school and through play 
  • families set up positive routines that support their child’s development 
  • and gives professionals insight into how to support children and families. Read our full evaluation on NSPCC Learning.  

We’ve trained 1,300 professionals to use GCP2, in 85 local authority areas. In 2019/20 alone, our partner organisations used the GCP2 assessment tool to support 16,500 families around the UK. Our training is available in multiple languages, and we’ve developed accessible versions for adults and children with Learning disabilities.

 

Help deliver GCP2 in your local area

Around 90% of our income is donated - we can only be here with your help.