Our performance and plans

The fight for every childhood is not easy but our hard work is already making a difference to children’s lives across the UK.

Download 2014/15 Annual Report

What we've achieved

More than one million children kept safe from abuse and neglect in 2014/151

Over the last year, we've increased the reach of our services, campaigned for change, and formed new partnerships to help provide greater support to children and families that need it the most. What we've achieved this year has shown that working together - with governments, professionals, businesses, local communities and families – piece by piece, we can have the greatest impact and deliver positive outcomes for young people.

Working with children and families through
our services

Providing parents with support early in a child's life can limit risk. Together, our services across the UK and reporting have helped provide parents and families with support when it's most needed.

Our award-nominated Baby Steps programme has helped parents to improve quality in their relationship with their babies, increased satisfaction in their relationship with their partner, improved emotional wellbeing and improved birth outcomes.

Our Better Start partnership in Blackpool aims to tackle the root causes of developmental inequality such as alcohol abuse, domestic violence and social isolation.

The local community is at the heart of the partnership – we worked with parents to develop a bespoke programme which meets local needs and expectations and is as sustainable and effective as possible.

Family Smiles, our service supporting children when mental health difficulties affect their mum or dad, has been chosen by Manchester University to be the template for a new, larger trial proposal.

"Baby Steps helped me to reduce my anxiety because I felt that if something went wrong, I could call Jenny and Sara to ask them about it."

Read Joanna's story

People

We help keep 1 million children a year safe from abuse and neglect

Explanation: This figure is calculated based on the following NSPCC activity for 2014/15:

  • the Schools Services reached 424,210 children
  • the NSPCC helpline received 61,709 contacts, which we estimate relate to over 100,000 children
  • Share Aware prompted 400,000 parents to speak to their child about online safety
  • ChildLine provided almost 300,000 counselling sessions (some children will have received more than one session).

Almost 300,000 ChildLine counselling sessions with children and young people. 

Explanation: ChildLine carried out 286,812 in-depth counselling sessions with children and young people, some of whom were going through the toughest times of their lives. Nearly 1,400 dedicated, trained volunteers were there to support them.

If children don't know what abuse is they may never tell anyone when something bad is happening to them. That's why we've worked so hard to expand our NSPCC Schools Service.

The NSPCC Schools Service uses trained volunteers to talk to primary school children about abuse and how to protect themselves from it. In 2014/15 we visited 6,231 schools, reaching 424,210 children2. This tremendous progress puts us on track to achieve our goal of reaching every primary school child in the UK by 2016.

Child protection through local partnerships

Through our training and consultancy we share our expertise with professionals across the UK.

This year we've delivered training to 799 organisations across the 4 nations. This has helped us reach around 5,300 people.

Training delivered to 799 organisations across the 4 nations.

Explanation: Through our training and consultancy we share our expertise with professionals across the UK. In 2014/15 we delivered training to 799 organisations across the four nations through 514 training events – reaching around 5,300 people.

Neglect is the biggest reason for child protection authorities to become involved in family life. Without the appropriate assessment and intervention, neglect can seriously affect the physical, social and emotional development of children from birth onwards.

For this reason, we've established sexual abuse and neglect hubs to share our knowledge and expertise with professionals - helping them to provide the right support for families in the community.

How you've played your part in the fight for every childhood

Our services for children and families rely on your support. Enthusiastic, passionate and dedicated - our volunteers are heroes to us and the children we work to protect.

From helping at collections at local shopping centres, taking part in an event or working in the community through our Schools Service and campaigning, we rely on our volunteers and the fantastic things they do to make our work possible.

"In 1980 a friend asked if I would join the NSPCC’s Dungannon fundraising committee, and since then I haven’t looked back."

Read Jennifer Hobson's story

Volunteer Lynn Brimmel wins Point of Light award

Lynn Brimmell, from North Somerset first got involved with the NSPCC in 2006, as a volunteer counsellor for our ChildLine service. She would spend her Wednesday afternoons listening to and talking to children about lots of different issues. In 2011, Lynn then decided to support as a volunteer with the NSPCC Schools Service

This year, Lynn and other Schools Service volunteers in North Somerset shared a magnificent milestone - visiting 100% of all schools in North Somerset.

Lynn has made a massive contribution to our work in the area. So much so that this year she received a Point of Light award for making a change in the community through the Schools Service. You can read what she had to say about the award and her experiences of volunteering with us on page 23 of our 2014/15 Annual Report.

Our campaigns

Share Aware is our campaign to help parents talk to their children about staying safe online.

Since the Share Aware campaign launched in January 2015, over 3 million people have watched and shared the campaign films 'I saw your willy' and 'Lucy and the boy'. Over 30,000 Share Aware guides have also been sent to schools and parents so that they feel confident to have these conversations with their children.

To date, around 400,000 parents have spoken to their child as a direct result of this campaign.

Peter Wanless outside 10 Downing Street - Order in Court campaignOur Order in Court campaign called on the Government to improve the experiences of the 21,000 children and young people give evidence in court every year.

Many MPs voiced their support, and 21,000 of you signed our Order in Court petition, one for every child that gives evidence in court each year. Three months after we launched the campaign, government announced that it will ensure there will be compulsory training for barristers taking part in sexual abuse cases, and vulnerable children will be able to choose to give evidence from a place where they feel comfortable.

This is fantastic progress for the protection of vulnerable children. Without your support this would not have been possible.

In October 2014, we launched our Flaw in the Law campaign to make it illegal for an adult to send a sexual message to a child. Thanks to your help this is now a reality. Over 50,000 of you signed a petition and wrote to the Minister for Online Child Protection calling for a new law.

Thorough policy work, carefully targeted lobbying, our e-petition and the weight of NSPCC supporter opinion were all essential in securing this shift and prompting the government into action. In December 2014, the Prime Minister announced that the Government would introduce legislation that makes sexual messagingn from adults to children illegal. This was only possible thanks to your help.

In March 2015 the Queen approved the Serious Crime Bill, which means that it is now a criminal offence for an adult to send a sexual message to a child.

Our strategy

Providing well defined and distinct activities where we can maximise our impact.

Concentrating on specific types of abuse and on children who are at most risk to ensure our intervention creates the greatest impact.

Everything we do creates learning. We will capture that learning and use it to create a cycle of improvement.

We cannot end cruelty to children on our own. We will work with and through others to multiply our impact many times over.

Our services and research help prevent abuse and support children and families

Every child has basic needs: food, shelter, security, affection, positive encouragement and education. If there is domestic abuse, mental health or substance abuse problems at home, these needs may not be met.

Families need the right support to give their children everything they need to develop healthily and thrive, as well as help with any problems that may cause them to struggle looking after their children.

Find out more about our work

Neglect

Neglect is the ongoing failure to meet a child's basic needs. It's dangerous and children can suffer serious and long-term harm.
Read more about neglect

Graded Care Profile

Assessing the care of children and identifying neglect.
Graded Care Profile service

Evidence Based Decisions

Reviewing family situations to protect children at risk of harm.
Evidence Based Decisions service

Improving parenting, improving practice

Helping parents who are struggling to care for their children.
Improving parenting, improving practice service

SafeCare

Encouraging, informing and promoting better parenting to protect young children from harm.
SafeCare service

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources

Child sexual abuse is a public health problem, but society and all social services can work together to prevent it.

Both adults and children must understand what sexual abuse is, recognise the signs and feel safe to speak up if they’re ever worried.

If a child abused, they need help to overcome their experience to keep themselves safe from further abuse or showing harmful sexual behaviour towards others as they grow up.

We also have to work with adult sex offenders to understand why and how they abuse children, so that we can help prevent them from reoffending and deter others from abusing children.

Find out more about our work

National Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service (NCATS)

Treating young high risk people who show the most serious kinds of harmful sexual behaviour.
National Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service (NCATS)

Letting the Future In

Letting the Future In helps children who have been sexually abused.
Letting the Future In service

Assessing the Risk, Protecting the Child

We assess and work with adults to reduce the risk of child sexual abuse.
Assessing the Risk service

Turn the Page

We protect children from the most common type of contact sexual abuse.
Turn the Page service

The Underwear Rule

A simple way that parents can help keep children safe from sexual abuse – without using scary words or even mentioning sex.
Find out about PANTS

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources


Parents need to encourage warm and positive relationships within the family, and set clear boundaries and non-physical forms of discipline for children.

Early support is needed as soon as there are warning signs that can lead to physical abuse such mental illness, drug or alcohol abuse, violent behaviour or other stressful situations the family may experience.

For those affected, social services for adults and children must treat the adults and children involved as a family unit, and children should be allowed to rebuild and strengthen their relationship with their non-abusive parent.

Find out more about our work

Caring Dads: Safer Children

Helping fathers see the impact their violent behaviour has on their children and how they can make positive changes for the future.
Caring Dads: Safer Children service

Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together

Helping mums and children strengthen their relationship after domestic abuse.
DART - Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together service

Family Environment: Drug Using Parents (FEDUP)

Protecting children living with adult drug and alcohol misuse.
FEDUP - Family Environment: Drug Using Parents service

Family SMILES

Support and life skills for children who live with mums or dads with mental health difficulties.
Family SMILES service

Physical abuse

Physical abuse is deliberately hurting a child causing injuries such as bruises, broken bones, burns or cuts.
Read more about physical abuse

Keeping children safe

Find out how you can keep children safe from abuse and other dangers, both online and in the physical world.
Learn how to keep them safe

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources

Pregnancy and the early years provide the essential foundation for how children grow, learn and behave. To give their baby the best possible start, both mums and dads need support through antenatal education and care, as well as help managing the stresses of being new parents.

People who work with babies and young children like midwives, health visitors and GPs also play a vital role in supporting new parents and identifying when they may need help.  If we don’t act early, we risk storing up problems for the future.

Find out about our work

Baby Steps

Ante-natal programme helping vulnerable parents cope with the pressures of having a baby.
Baby Steps service

All Babies Count: prevention and protection for vulnerable babies

Reviews the current research on the vulnerability of babies to abuse and neglect and presents analysis of the risk factors and suggestions for early intervention.
Find out more

Parents Under Pressure™

Improving parenting in families with drug or alcohol issues.
Parents Under Pressure™ service

All Babies Count: spotlight on drugs and alcohol

Looks at how babies are affected by parental substance misuse, interventions that are available and what can be done to improve policy.
Find out more

Coping with Crying

Helping parents to keep calm and soothe their crying baby.
Coping with Crying service

Minding the Baby

Minding the Baby is an early intervention programme designed to enhance the mother's relationship with her child.
Minding the Baby service

Baby and toddler safety

Advice and tips for parents on bonding with your baby, crying, difficult behaviour and what to do if you can't cope.
Read about baby safety

All Babies Count: spotlight on perinatal mental health - prevention in mind

Report on how mental illnesses affects women during pregnancy and after birth, and improvements that can be made to identify, treat and prevent it.
Find out more

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources

Care is a vital part of our child protection system. Most children who go into care may have been abused and neglected, so therapeutic support is needed to help them overcome their experience and rebuild their lives.

Improvements can also be made to the system so that children’s needs are properly assessed when they go into care, they have stable placements and the services involved like social care, health, and education work together in their best interest.

When it’s being considered that a child can go back into their home, they need the proper assessment to make sure it’s right for the child. Once at home both the child and their family need continued support.

Find out more about our work

Children in care

Find out about our work with looked after children, the challenges in care and what the law says
Find out more

Taking Care

Helping to make sure children only return home from care when it’s safe and with the right support.
Taking Care service

Returning home from care: what's best for children

A report examining issues around children returning home from care, how to address problems of reunification and services that can help.
Find out more

Face to Face

Improving the emotional well-being of children in care, or who may go into care, by helping them find solutions to problems affecting their lives.
Face to Face service

What works in preventing and treating poor mental health in looked after children?

Overview of the evidence about what works in preventing and treating poor mental health of children in care.
Find out more

New Orleans Intervention Model

Reducing the risk of abuse or neglect by helping professionals assess if children should stay in care.
New Orleans Intervention Model service

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources

Abuse can happen to any child, but children in particular communities can be more vulnerable to child trafficking, FGM or sexual exploitation.

Children from minority ethnic communities need to be better represented in the child protection system. Social services must be able respond appropriately to their needs, and balance culturally sensitive practice with a child-centred focus.

Find out more about our work

Child trafficking

Child trafficking is a type of abuse where children are recruited, moved or transported and then exploited, forced to work or sold. 
Read more about child trafficking

Female genital mutilation (FGM)

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is the partial or total removal of external female genitalia for non-medical reasons. 
Read more about female genital mutilation

Child sexual exploitation

Child sexual exploitation is a type of sexual abuse in which children are sexually exploited for money, power or status.
Read more about child sexual exploitation

Changing Together

We are discovering why children from BME communities are vulnerable and how our services can best reach them.
Changing Together service

Keeping children safe

Find out how you can keep children safe from abuse and other dangers, both online and in the physical world.
Learn how to keep them safe

Research and resources

Read our latest research, leaflets, guidance and evaluations that share what we've learned from our services for children and families.
Find research and resources

We need to shift attitudes and social assumptions about disabled children, so that the focus is on their specific needs and views are understood. They must be given a voice through advocacy services, peer support or creative therapies.

People who work with them need to be given time to listen to their viewpoint and work together more closely with other professionals so the child's needs are at the centre of their work.

Disabled children also need help to develop an understanding of what abuse is, how to protect themselves and how they can get help.

Further research is needed into the types of abuse that disabled children experience, so that we can find ways to better protect them.

Learn more about our services

Read more

Support our campaigns

Together, we can continue to change laws, attitudes and help parents across the UK keep their children safe. 

Support our campaigns

Donate now

You can give a child like Maisie the gift of safety. Your generous donation will ensure that our Letting the Future In service will be there for children who need our help.

Donate now

References

  1. 1. Source: NSPCC (2015) Piece by piece: annual report and accounts 2014/15

    Explanation: This figure is calculated based on the following NSPCC activity for 2014/15: In 2014/15: the Schools Services reached 424,210 children; the NSPCC helpline received 61,709 contacts, which we estimate relate to over 100,000 children; Share Aware prompted 400,000 parents to speak to their child about online safety; and ChildLine provided almost 300,000 counselling sessions (some children will have received more than one session).

  2. 2. Source: NSPCC (2015) Piece by piece: annual report and accounts 2014/15

    Explanation: The NSPCC Schools Service delivers assemblies and workshops. Volunteers help children understand and identify the different forms of abuse and how to get help. In 2014/15 our Schools Service visited 6,231 schools. Through the service we reached 424,210 children, up 52% on 2013/14.