We're working with midwives in Wales to help new parents

Our Coping with Crying service has been adopted by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University health board in parts of Wales.

AMBU is among one of the first health boards in the UK to adopt the innovative programme which prepares parents for the stress they might feel when their baby cries and helps them to cope better. 

The programme involves midwives and health professionals showing new parents a short film before they are discharged from hospital.

Midwives from Neath Port Talbot Maternity Unit, Singleton Hospital in Swansea and the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend will be delivering the programme to new mums.


Coping with Crying

Our programme, Coping with Crying, prepares parents for the stress they might feel when their baby cries and help them to cope better. It aims to prevent non-accidental head injuries.

The NSPCC in Swansea introduced Coping with Crying in 2013. So far, more than 8,000  new parents within the ABMU Health Board area have seen the film. 

Coping with Crying service

Children's stories

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"This video was amazing. It’s something that has stuck with me ever since watching it."
Jolene / Mother

Elonwy Evans, NSPCC Swansea practitioner said:
“Looking after a crying baby is hard but for some families it can be very serious. A baby’s continuous crying has been linked to stress, depression and relationship problems.

“In extreme cases, parents may become angry and harm their baby. When babies are shaken, thrown or handled roughly this can result in what’s called non-accidental head injuries. It’s the leading cause of death and long-term disability for babies who are harmed."

Bridgend mum Jolene, 19, mum to six month old Joie, said:
“This video was amazing. It’s something that has stuck with me ever since watching it. I didn’t know much about shaken baby syndrome so it was one of the most useful parenting videos I could have seen.

“I think it would be a really good idea for parents to watch it separately, so that they can talk about it afterwards and let it all sink in. I think it might hit them harder if they were on their own.

“I was watching it and holding Joie at the same time - holding him really tight and crying my eyes out. It hasn’t left me since, and is something that will always be in the back of my mind.”

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