Evaluation of how we support organisations to deliver Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together (DART™) Our implementation evaluation of the scale-up of our DART™ service

Child drawing in book with womanDomestic Abuse, Recovering Together (DART™) helps children and mothers get back on track after experiencing domestic abuse. We’ve evaluated DART™ and found that it was effective.

So that we can reach and help more children and families, we’re now scaling up our successful services. As part of this, we train practitioners from other organisations to deliver our programmes.

DART™ is the first service we’ve scaled up. So, to help us understand what works when scaling up a service, we carried out an implementation evaluation.

We’ll be using what we’ve learnt to improve the way we scale up other services in the future. This is part of our Impact and evidence series.

Author: Isabella Stokes
Published: 2017

Experiences of professionals

  • Professionals thought the programme was important because it focuses on the relationship between the mother and her child, instead of working with them both in isolation
  • After the training, professionals were enthusiastic about DART™ and said they felt confident about delivering the programme.

Problems delivering DART™

  • Although 8 organisations had been trained, only 2 were actively delivering DART™ by April 2017. However, since our data was collected 8 organisations have started delivering DART™ and more have expressed an interest in taking it on.
  • Professionals reported barriers to running the programme, many of which they did not foresee. These included problems with funding, staffing, transport, venues and issues with taking children out of school.

Improvements to the scaling-up of DART™

Based on our findings, we’ve made improvements to the way we scale-up DART™:

  • developed stronger assessments to help us find out if organisations are ready to deliver DART™
  • provide a breakdown of anticipated costs to organisations who are considering taking on the service
  • offer more support to tackle challenges which arise
  • help organisations to link up with each other so they can share waiting lists, costs and staff members
  • organisations are now able to deliver the programme with 2 volunteers and 2 staff members (instead of the previous 4 staff members).
 Executive summary
 Key findings  5
 Background  6
 Methodology  9
 Results  11
 Conclusion  23
 References  24

"It wasn’t like some training you go to and it’s just somebody reading out of a manual, it was really interesting because [the trainers had] actually facilitated it … they were quite experienced in it so they really knew what they were talking about and they were quite passionate about it."

Please cite as: Stokes, I. (2017) Implementation evaluation of Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together (DART) scale-up: impact and evidence briefing. London: NSPCC.

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Domestic Abuse, Recovering Together (DART™)

Helping children and mothers strengthen their relationship after domestic abuse.
DART - Domestic Abuse Recovering Together service

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