Children are trafficked into and within the UK. It’s a form of child abuse and it’s everyone's responsibility to be aware of the signs that a child may have been trafficked and know who to report concerns to.

Worried about a child?

Contact our trained helpline counsellors for 24/7 help, advice and support.

0808 800 5000

Report a concern

Child Trafficking Advice Centre

If you work with children or young people who may have been trafficked into the UK, contact our specialist service for information and advice.

Call us or email help@nspcc.org.uk for more information.

0808 800 5000

Find out more about CTAC

Free to move, invisible to care

Read the latest report from our Child Trafficking Advice Centre (CTAC) on the coordination and accountability towards Romanian unaccompanied minors’ safety.

Find out more

Practice advice for professionals

Professionals should report their trafficking concerns, via a first responder such as CTAC, to the National Referral Mechanism.

Once a child has been identified as a victim of trafficking they need to be appropriately protected and supported. This may include:

  • immediate emergency protection
  • assessment of their needs
  • a safe place to live
  • interpreters
  • therapeutic services
  • witness support so they can testify against the traffickers
  • advocacy
  • help with regularising their immigration status or returning to their home country
  • reunification
  • education and developing self-protection skills

(HM Government, 2011).

Supporting children who have been trafficked

DO:

  • use qualified interpreters to communicate with the child.

DON’T:

  • use an interpreter who comes from the same country as the child. After their experiences a child may be wary of adults from their home country.
  • use family members, friends or members of the public as interpreters.

Advice booklets for children, young people and professionals

Our Child Trafficking Advice Centre (CTAC) has produced a series of leaflets for professionals working in differents sectors:

They've also developed 3 booklets specifically for the ICARUS (Improving Coordination and Accountability towards Romanian Unaccompanied minors’ Safety) project. We are the UK partner of this European Commission-funded project to protect vulnerable children from Romania.

Being moved to the UK from another country can be confusing for children and young people. Our booklets helps children understand their experiences and rights in the UK. It explains terms like ‘refugee’, ‘asylum seeker’ and ‘trafficking’ and introduces the different people, places and processes that they might come across.

There are 2 booklets for children:

We have also produced a booklet of advice for professionals who are working to safeguard children who have been moved across borders from Romania to the UK. It covers how to respond to concerns that a child has been trafficked and what to consider when working with a child from Romania such as which agencies to contact.

Legislation, policy and guidance

Details of legislation, policy and guidance about child trafficking in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and internationally.
See legislation, policy and guidance

What we do about child trafficking

Child Trafficking Advice Centre

If you work with children or young people who may have been trafficked into the UK, contact our specialist service for information and advice.

Call us or email help@nspcc.org.uk for more information.

0808 800 5000

Find out more about CTAC
People

We've dealt with over 1,300 cases of child trafficking since 2007

Explanation: Between November 2007 and October 2015 the NSPCC’s Child Trafficking Advice Centre (CTAC) dealt with 1,323 cases of child trafficking.

CTAC is a specialist service providing information and advice to any professional working with children or young people who may have been trafficked into the UK. Find out more about our Child Trafficking Advice Centre (CTAC).

See also Indicator 19 in How safe are our children? 2016.

Protect and Respect

For young people who are vulnerable to sexual exploitation or who have been sexually exploited.
Protect and Respect service

Child Trafficking Advice Centre

If you work with children or young people who may have been trafficked into the UK, contact our specialist service for information and advice.

Call us or email help@nspcc.org.uk for more information.

0808 800 5000

Find out more about CTAC

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Childline

Childline is our free, confidential helpline for children and young people. Whenever children need us, Childline is there for them – by phone, email or live chat.

0800 1111

Read about Childline

Speak out. Stay safe.

Our programme (formerly Childline Schools Service) uses specially trained staff and volunteers to talk to primary school children about abuse.
Speak Out. Stay Safe.

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Help and advice for professionals

Library catalogue

We hold the UK's largest collection of child protection resources and the only UK database specialising in published material on child protection, child abuse and child neglect.

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Research and resources

Research, reports and resources about child trafficking
Read more

Information Service

Our free service for people who work with children can help you find the latest policy, practice, research and news on child protection and related subjects.

For more information, call us or email help@nspcc.org.uk.

0808 800 5000

Submit an enquiry

References

  1. HM Government (2011) Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked: practice guidance (PDF). London: Department for Education (DfE). pp. 19-21.