Teenage girl sat on sofaGirls living in communities that practise FGM are most at risk.

Data on FGM is only collected in 27 countries in Africa and also in Yemen (WHO, 2012), but we know FGM is practiced in up to 42 African countries in the Middle East and in Asia (House of Commons International Development Committee, 2013).

FGM can happen in the UK or abroad.

In the UK, the Home Office has identified girls from the Somali, Kenyan, Ethiopian, Sudanese, Sierra Leonean, Egyptian, Nigerian, Eritrean, Yemeni, Kurdish and Indonesian communities at most risk of FGM (HM Government, 2016).

Girls are also at risk if FGM has been carried out on their mother, sister or a member of their extended family (HM Government, 2016).

Worried about FGM?

Call the FGM helpline if you're worried a child is at risk of, or has had, FGM.

It's free, anonymous and we're here 24/7.

0800 028 3550

fgmhelp@nspcc.org.uk

The age at which FGM is carried out varies. It may be carried out when a girl is new-born, during childhood or adolescence, just before marriage or during pregnancy.

Explanation: The age at which FGM is carried out varies enormously according to the community.

More about FGM

Signs, indicators and effects

Find out more about the signs, indicators and effects of female genital mutilation (FGM).

Identifying the signs of FGM

Prevent and protect

How to help keep children safe from female genital mutilation (FGM).

Prevent and protect children from FGM

Facts and statistics

Facts and statistics about female genital mutilation (FGM).

See FGM statistics

What you can do

Donate now

Our services are helping turn lives around. Your gift can help rebuild lives, and prevent abuse from ruining any more.

Make a donation

Work or volunteer with children and families?

Visit NSPCC Learning for information, resources and training to help you safeguard and protect children and young people across the UK.

Go to NSPCC Learning

Work or volunteer with children and families?

Visit NSPCC Learning for information, resources and training to help you safeguard and protect children and young people across the UK.

Go to NSPCC Learning

References

  1. HM Government (2016) Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation (PDF). [London]: Home Office.

  2. House of Commons International Development Committee (2013) Violence against women and girls: second report of session 2013-14 (PDF). London: The Stationery Office.

  3. World Health Organization (WHO) (2012) Female genital mutilation (PDF). Geneva: World Health Organization (WHO).